Sunday, 25 January 2015

Shalee lhaih 2015: shiaghtin 04

Go here for English version. Note, this is rewritten from scratch, not a direct translation.

19oo-25oo Jerrey Geuree

Jerrey kerroo shiaghtin ny Shalee Lhaih. Shoh ny lhiah mee yn çhiaghtin shoh chaie:

Forward the Mage (Eric Flint, Richard Roach)

Cha row mee shickyr cre'n sorçh dy lioar v'ayn, agh ghow eh toshiaght dy mie myr skeeal fansee aitt. Haink ailley orrym rish y skeeal arraghey reayrtys dys druiaght yl-focklagh 'sy nah ayrn; v'eh beggan aitt, agh haink shen y ve rouyr, beggan dree er lhiam. Agh haink y bree erash dy fondagh, as cha dod mee scuirrey jeh. Ta schlei aittys ec Flint gyn ourys, gollrish Craig Shaw Gardner, agh tra ta CSG cur magh gannidaght hene cooie da cloie aitt, share lesh Flint rieughid stroshey son y chooid smoo. Ny gow shen myr oghsan; va mee mynghearey er feie ny lioar, as gearey er ard nish as reesht. Shen moylley hene, bhoy. Ta mee jeeaghym roym rish lioar elley 'sy 'traih.

Numenera (Monte Cook)

Shoh lioar reillyn da gamman cloie paart, Numenera. As she lioar 'oawragh t'ayn, nagh nee! Cha nod mee jannoo briwnys er 'syn aght cliaghtagh. 'Sy chooish shoh, ta daa varel aym. Er y derrey laue, ta anaase aym er y ghamman, as s'mie lhiam y seihll as reillyn ta Cook er soilshaghey magh. Er y laue elley, er lhiam nagh dod mee stiurey gamman jeh, son cha noddym toiggal y seihll shoh trooid as trooid. Ta'n lioar shoh foawragh, son y chooid smoo, er y fa dy vel Monte soilshaghey magh ymmodee buill 'sy teihll: caayryn, sleityn, baljyn beggey çheerey, keyljyn as ooilley shen. Ta ny coontyssyn shoh mynphoyntagh as lane dy vree. Ny yei shen, she seihll lane whaagh t'ayn (jeh yioin) as er y fa shen, er lhiam by ghoillee dou lhieeney ny barnaghyn eddyr ny buill shen, chamoo croo my chooid hene. Chreid mee hoshiaght dy row Cook jannoo ro-liauyr yn lioar shoh (as v'eh beggan dree lhaih y lane lioar duillag as duillag, agh cha nel eh jerkal rhyt shen y yannoo, s'cosoylagh), agh nish ta mee toiggal: shegin da shen y yannoo.

The Great Stone Face (Nathaniel Hawthorne)

Kiare skeealyn taitnyssagh as neuchramp. Ta aght Hawthorne foddey ass y chliaghtey nish; t'eh focklagh as meiygh. Ta'n eash ry-akin orroo dy baghtal, agh er lhiam dy row yn aght cooie da'n chooid. She skeealyn imlee t'ayn, as ad er bun firrinys rere y ghoan foslee. Cha nel mian orrym dy lhiam ram stoo ta screeuit ec Hawthorne, t'eh ro-neuchramp as ta'n aght beggan neuvyn er lhiam, agh va ny skeealyn shoh mie dy liooar my s'mie lhiat stroo Victorianagh.

Fockle s'jerree

Lhaih mee 3 lioaryn, va 151 yn çhiaghtin shoh chaie, myr shen ta 148 faagit dou nish.


English version

19th-25th January

The end of week four of the Reading Project. Here's what I've read this week:

Forward the Mage (Eric Flint, Richard Roach)

I wasn't sure what I was expecting - a hazard of gathering ebooks sometimes - but Flint soon drew me into this humorous fantasy story. I was much disgruntled and disappointed by a viewpoint switch, which took me from an entrancingly novel protagonist to a deeply verbose and rather tiresome character. While this is deliberate and for comic effect, I felt like it was overdone and the story was becoming dull. Luckily, from the next switch vim and vigour returned, and never left again. Flint's writing here resembled my old favourite Craig Shaw Gardner, but while CSG produces pure slapstick farce, Flint offers something less overtly ludicrous. I was grinning through most of my read, and even laughed out loud not a few times. Praise indeed. I hope he'll get round to producing a sequel.

Numenera (Monte Cook)

This is the manual for a roleplaying game. It's a huge book, and RPGs don't lend themselves to the usual literary analysis. In this case, my opinion of it as a game is rather split. On the one hand, I'm intrigued by this game and its world, both from reading it and from my other exposure to it. On the other hand, I really don't feel I could confidently run a game in this system, because I don't have a holistic grasp of the world. The main reason for the book's size is that Cook has included a sprawling gazetteer of the world, covering in detail dozens of cities, towns, mountains, ruins, forests and their inhabitants. Although reading through the details got rather dry (in fairness, it's not a novel, it's a roleplaying tool), most of it was creative and full of attractive strangeness. The problem is that the very strangeness and disjointedness that Cook emphasises makes it nigh-impossible for me to think how I'd fill in the blanks between, let alone come up with my own content. I now realise that including all that detail wasn't just the urge to get his creation down on paper, but a bit of a necessity.

The Great Stone Face (Nathaniel Hawthorne)

A simple, pleasant set of four stories. Hawthorne's style is definitely out of fashion now, verbose and rather sentimental, but although these now seem quite dated, I found they worked well for these stories. They're simple, almost humble stories, all based loosely on some real thing or event. I don't think I'd want to read a lot of his work, as it feels simplistic and the style now grates a bit, but these were fine.

Afterword

I read 3 books, I began with 151, so 148 are left over.

Sunday, 18 January 2015

Shalee lhaih 2015: shiaghtin 03

Go here for English version. Note, this is rewritten from scratch, not a direct translation.

12h-18oo Jerrey Geuree

Jerrey nah hiaghtin ny Shalee Lhaih. Shoh ny lhiah mee yn çhiaghtin shoh chaie:

Japanese Reader Collection Volume 1: Hikoichi (Clay & Yumi Boutwell)

Cha row mee jerkal rish y lioar ynsee shoh ve wheesh taitnyssagh. T'ad er nyannoo briwnyssyn mie ny trooid; t'ee neuchramp, agh she skeealyn anaasoil t'ayn as blass orroo. She genre ainjyssagh t'ayn, bentyn rish Hikoichi, ny 'er inçhynagh as ny chluigeyr ny keayrtyn. Ta fo-noteyn cur cooney cooie dhyt, as ta lhieggan Shapaanish ynrican ayn myr cliaghtey.

Mega Fauna (re. Jeffrey Ellis)

Çhaglym lane vie, mysh daeed skeeal nagh vel casley rish y cheilley, ga dy vel dagh nane jeh bentyn rish beiyn. Ta blass eddrym orroo ooilley, agh ta kuse jeh aittys hene, as kuse elley moralagh, ny contoyrtyssyn beggey. Bare lhiam kuse jeh na kuse elley, agh by vie lhiam dagh nane. Ta ellyn as focklaght er lheh ec dagh skeeal.

Fockle s'jerree

Lhaih mee 3 lioaryn, va 153 aym yn çhiaghtin shoh chaie, myr shen ta 151 faagit dou nish. Shen moal. T'eh orrym lhiam 3 lioaryn 'sy çhiaghtin...


English version

12th-18th January

The end of week three of the Reading Project. Here's what I've read this week:

Japanese Reader Collection Volume 1: Hikoichi (Clay & Yumi Boutwell)

An unexpectedly good and entertaining reader. The collection is well-judged, simple and a familiar genre, but still flavourful. It presents the text in three formats: Japanese with notes, Japanese only, and English gloss. I found the annotated version was enough to check the odd word or expression, then read the plain Japanese for practice, and only used the English to confirm once I'd read each story. The annotations were clear and helpful.

Mega Fauna (re. Jeffrey Ellis)

A fun and varied collection of stories. They're generally light in tone, but range from cute little bits of fun to improving tales or mini-adventures. Some tickled me more than others, but it was all good stuff.

Afterword

I read 3 books, I began the week with 153, so 151 are left over. Not really up to scratch - I need to be reading three a week.

Monday, 12 January 2015

Shalee lhaih 2015: shiaghtin 02

Go here for English version. Note, this is rewritten from scratch, not a direct translation.

5oo-11d Jerrey Geuree

Jerrey nah hiaghtin ny Shalee Lhaih. Shoh ny lhiah mee yn çhiaghtin shoh chaie:

Parzival (Wolfram von Eschenbach)

Shoh skeeal reejerraghyn as y lheih, screeuit ec Germaanagh 'sy 13oo eash. T'eh mastey skeealaghyn elley Artur as y lheid, as va mian aym dy 'eddyn magh barel elley er ny shenn skeeallyn shen. Agh shegin dou gra nagh dod mee roshtyn jerrey y chied chabdil. T'eh çhyndaait ass Germaanish Veanagh, as er lhiam dy nee obbyr gharroo t'ayn. Ve fouesyn cummey as blass ny Germaanish y hauail aynsyn, foddee? Aghterbee, ta coraa yn ughtar skyrraghey mygeayrt gollrish sheeabin er rio. 'Syn un raa, ta blass formoil bardagh as blass y theay er, as cha dod mee geddyn greim er.

Chammah's shen, my t'ou uss er lhaih ny skeealyn elley, t'ad lane dy mynphoyntyn: enmyn ynnydyn as sleih, ny ta sleih cur lhieu dys boayl elley, soilshaghey magh cummey as shennaghys dagh aall t'ad gee lesh... Ny keayrtyn t'eh gollrish Lioar ny Reeaghyn! "Ve soit er daa ghow jeig, three jeeaghyn lesh y twoaie, as three lesh y sheear, as three lesh y jiass, as three lesh y shiar: as va'n keayn soit er y dreeym oc, as va ooilley'n lieh jerree oc sthie fo e vean." as ooilley shen.

Cheayll mee dy nee skeeal mie t'ayn, agh cha noddym surrane y çhyndaays shoh. Lhaihym fer elley keayrt ennagh, foddee.

A Wizard Abroad (Diane Duane)

By vie lhiam bun y skeeal shoh: t'eh er y chaillin-obbee Nita goll dys Nerin as ceau y sourey marish e naunt. Ta'n skeeal mie dy liooar, screeuit dy fondagh as lane dy haghyrtyn. As s'mie lhiam ny karracteyryn son y chooid smoo, ta soilshit dy mie ec Duane. Agh shegin dou gra dy row red ennagh boirey orrym.

Leah 'sy skeeal, ta fer aeg feyshtey cre'n fa dy ren ny Pooaryn (Jee, s'cosoylagh) cur Nita gys Nerin; cre'n fa nagh dod ny Yernee nyn lomarcan dellal rish ny doilleedyn t'ayn? As dy jarroo, er lhiam nagh row freggyrt fondagh ry-akin 'sy skeeal. Cha nel ee jannoo red erbee nagh oddagh peiagh elley er nyannoo 'syn un voayl, er lhiam. T'ee feaysley er folliaght ny ghaa, agh choud's s'cooin lhiam, cha nel shen er bun schlei ny fys er lheh t'ecksh. Cha nee loght mooar t'ayn, agh er lhiam dy vel y feysht shoh gannoonaghey y skeeal.

Ta'n red elley foddey ny s'crampey, as s'cosoylagh nagh noddym eh y hoilshaghey magh dy baghtal. Ahem. As mish er lhaih ram (rouyr?) fansee ta soit sy 'teihll shoh, as cooid vooar jeh screeuit ec Americaanee, ta mee er ngoaill toshiaght credjal dy vel cleayney ayn dy 'yoarreeaghey' Nerin as Yernee as Yernish. Dy ghra myr shen, cliaghtey dy screeu mychione cooishyn Yernagh ayns yn aght cheddin, as myr shen lhiettrimys skeealagh orroo y chur. Cha nel mee çheet er beaynchroo, agh er yn ayrn t'ocsyn ayns skeeallyn. Dy ro-chadjin (er lhiams) ta blass ard-phishagagh ec Nerin, erskyn dagh ooilley çheer elley; as ta shen firrinys rere rieughid y skeeal, cha nee my varel hene t'ayn. Ta Nerin ny s'faggys da'n Teihll Shee as bugganeyn as spyrrydyn as myr shen, as t'ad çheet rish dy mennick. Ta ny Yernee cliaghtit rish pishagys as bugganeys, as credjallagh as oalyssagh dy liooar. Ta sheggagys ny strimmey ayns Nerin. Ta kiangley eddyr Yernish as pishagys; ny keayrtyn ta Yernish y red cheddin as çhengey phishagys, ny keayrtyn elley t'ad jus casley rish y cheilley.

Wahll, er lhiam dy vel eiyrtys neuyerkit ec y chleayney shen: t'eh rang-oardraghey cooishyn Yernagh myr quaagh, as lane dy phishagys, as neughooghyssagh, as... wahll, joarree.

Cha nel eh quaagh dy vel ram skeealyn ayn bentyn rish Nerin as fansee. Ren Tolkein kiangley eddyr oc. Ta ny feayn-skeealyn Celtiagh coadit dy mie ayns Nerin, as haink cooishyn Arthuragh y ve bun fansee 'syn Oarpey, as myr shen va cummaght lajer ec cooishyn Yernagh er y ghenre. Cha nel monney fys cadjin ain mychione feayn-skeeallaght ny h-Anglo-Hostnee. As ta feayn-skeealyn Celtiagh mie er enney ec screeudeyryn 'sy Vaarle, tra nagh vel fys mie oc feayn-skeealyn Frangish, Germaanish, ny Rooshish. Agh, my she ynnyd as ayrn Nerin t'ayn er son dy bragh, ny çheer phishagys as shenn reddyn neughooghyssagh, ta shen cur geulaghyn urree dy ve ny boayl joarree. Ny red ennagh myr shen. S'doillee eh soilshaghey magh y barel lieh-chummit shoh! Cha nee foill yn skeeal shoh hene t'ayn, chamoo yn skeeal shoh ynrican; she cleayney genre fansee t'ayn as shoh sampleyr jeh, shen ooilley.

This is how fucking scary the ocean is (Colleen Webber)

Skeealeen jesh as aalin mychione y cheayn, as ny kianglaghyn t'eddyr eshyn as shinyn. T'ee screeuit dy baghtal as ta caslyssyn lane dy vree er dagh duillag - dy jarroo, ta dagh duillag ny caslys. Ta blass aitt kiune sooraghey y fysseree t'ayn. Hoght duillagyn ta feeu lhaih, my nod oo geddyn greim orroo! Ghow mee y skeealeen shoh myr dean loggyr Kickstarter tra chionnee mee lioar elley (Waterlogged).

Fockle s'jerree

Wahll, shoh drogh-toshiaght dhyt. Hooar magh mee nagh by gooin lhiam kuse dy lioaryn-l tra screeu mee yn rolley hoshiaght. Va 15 lioaryn jarroodit aym. Myr shen, va 159 lioaryn aym ec toshiaght ny bleeaney, as 156 yn çhiaghtin shoh chaie.

Lhaih mee 3 lioar, va 156 aym yn çhiaghtin shoh chaie, myr shen ta 153 faagit dou nish.


English version

5th-11th of January

The end of week one of the Reading Project. Here's what I've read this week:

Parzival (Wolfram von Eschenbach)

A book of knightly derring-do and so forth, written in the 13th century. It's part of the Grail cycle of Arthurian stories, and having heard of it I was interested to get another perspective. Sadly I have to confess I gave up before the end of the first chapter. It's translated from Middle High German, and I found it a pretty rough read. Perhaps they wanted to retain some of the structure and flavour of the original, which is usually praiseworthy, but the attempt doesn't do much for me. I found Wolfram's voice completely inconsistent, veering from high-falutin' poetical to earthy within a paragraph, or even a sentence. I simply couldn't settle into it.

Also, as you might know from similar stories, they love to cram in the details. Loving descriptions of journeys, recitations of names, and several sentences describing some item present at some event which will itself take pages to describe... it's too much for me. Shades of 1 Kings, if you know what I mean - all so many cubits and such-and-such wood.

It's supposed to be a good story, but I couldn't cope with this translation. Maybe another time.

A Wizard Abroad (Diane Duane)

I liked the premise of this book: the wizard Nita (from two previous books) is sent to Ireland to spend the summer with her aunt. The story itself is fine: well written, smooth and eventful. I also enjoyed the character interactions, as Duane depicts an array of interesting characters with few or many brushstrokes as required. That being said, a couple of things niggled at me.

Early in the story, a young man questions why the Powers (God, probably) sent Nita. Why couldn't the local wizards handle whatever was going on? And I have to say that I don't feel like the book really provided a compelling answer to that question. She plays a very low-key role in this story, supporting the actions of a whole gang of adult wizards. She does unravel a few puzzles and helps out, but it mostly seems to involve being in the right place at the right time. I can't recall any instance where some specific ability or knowledge of Nita's is the key. Her younger sister Dairine is vital, but a) that doesn't justify Nita, and b) she's vital in a rather tangential way. This isn't a huge flaw in the book, but I do think this question weakens the story somewhat.

The second isn't particular to this book, but an example of a trend I've started to notice in urban fantasy. There seems to be a tendency to assign Ireland and all things Irish (if they are discussed at all) to a particular box, which is the Most Mystical Country. Ireland tends to be the place with most 'residual magic' or whatever. Its history is very dominant, its boundaries between walls thin. Strange occurrences are common, mythological creatures relatively widespread, and the Irish themselves typically blasé about this through a mixture of wide credulity, affability and being inured to weirdness. The Irish language may be connected to the Magical Speech, and is often used to give extra weight to the mystical elements; fey usually speak Irish. This sort of thing isn't just my reading, but explicitly stated in the text.

While this sounds pretty cool, I think a result of this being common is that Ireland tends to be exoticised. Its canonical place as wondrous historical fairyland implies that other countries are the norm. Ireland is the outsider, the strange thing, the other. The weight given to it also tends to mean that other, more commonplace features of Ireland (and Irish, and Irish characters) are sidelined. Do not all countries have their own mythological backgrounds, just like Ireland, and their own languages? I have never seen Holland presented as a mystical place, Spanish as a tongue inherently connected to magic, the English as inured to the supernatural events so unusually common in their homeland. Germans do not have the second sight, Poles don't seem to be innately sensitive to psychic events.

I'm finding it quite hard to articulate (or pin down) what it is I'm trying to say, because I really don't know enough about these topics. It feels like Ireland in fantasy tends to be put in a box, and it's always a very similar box, and while it's a pretty flattering box in many ways, fundamentally it still doesn't leave much room to grow and breathe.

This is how fucking scary the ocean is (Colleen Webber)

A nice short, engagingly-illustrated piece about the sea and its relationship to us, putting some things in perspective. Touches of humour leaven the facts. It's only 8 pages, all hand-painted; give it a look.

Afterword

Not the best start... this week I realised I'd omitted 15 ebooks from the list (I've always been a bit wishy-washy about whether ebooks count as 'to read'). This means I actually began with 159 books, and last week 156 were left.

I read 3 books, I began the week with 156, so 153 are left over.

Sunday, 4 January 2015

Shalee lhaih 2015: shiaghtin 01

Go here for English version. Note, this is rewritten from scratch, not a direct translation.

1d-4oo Jerrey Geuree

Jerrey kied shiaghtin ny Shalee Lhaih. Shoh ny lhiah mee yn çhiaghtin shoh chaie:

The King in Yellow (Robert Chambers)

Ta ennym ny lioar shoh ry-chlashtyn tra ta peiagh erbee loayrt er far-skeealaght whaagh, fansee ny obbyr Lovecraft, as myr shen va mian orrym ish y lhaih. T'ee mie dy liooar, agh va mee jerkal rish lioar dy skeealyn quaagh; myr shen voir eh orrym dy nee skeealyn shennaghys t'ayn son y chooid smoo.

Hoshiaght, ta kiare skeealyn quaagh aynjee. T'ad covestey far-hennaghys, reddyn neughooghyssagh, as aght screeuee bardoil mea, as she skeealyn braew arraghtagh miolagh t'ayn.

Erskyn ooilley, ghow mee soylley jeh The Repairer of Reputations. She skeeal insheyder missilagh t'ayn, agh cha nel shen baghtal rish tammylt. Ta Chambers soilshaghey magh baanrid tayrnagh as scoaghagh, as cha nod oo goaill toshiaght ny snaieyn sniemmagh y 'eaysley derrey jerrey'n skeeal. Yiow uss dy vel rieughid hene y skeeal jeh geinnagh vio. Ta'n skeeal shoh mastey ny skeealyn quaagh share aym hannah.

Ta drama farskeealagh The King in Yellow hene ard-ghooagh; va cummaght vooar echey er y Cthulhu Mythos. T'eshyn ry-akin ayns The Yellow Sign, as dy firrinagh, cha row eh cha quaagh as ooilley shen. She cummey noa jeh'n shenn deyrey neughooghyssagh t'ayn, son y chooid smoo. Ny yei shen, t'eh screeuit dy mie er bashtal. Ta focklaght Hambers jannoo yn arreyder agglagh so-chredjal, chammah's ny smooinaghtyn as ashlishyn quaagh nagh nod ny karracteyryn geddyn rey roo. Ghow mee soylley jeh. Agh shegin dou gra, rere ambee yn skeeal shoh, va mee jerkal red ennagh foddey ny s'quaaghey!

Ta The Court of the Dragon, The Mask and The Damoiselle d'Ys nyn skeealyn fondagh neughooghyssagh, as blass beg quaaghid er Court. Ta annym oc ooilley, as rhyddim mie ta tayrn oo er oaie.

Ta ny fir elley nyn skeealyn shennaghyssagh. T'ad bentyn rish bea creoi: Paarys fo çhennid, ny bea ayns kerrooyn boghtey Bohemagh. Ta blass bardoil grouw orroo, as t'ad screeuit dy mie foast, agh shegin dou nagh ghow ad greim orryms. Va mee shirrey quaaghid, as cha row eh ry-gheddyn ayns shoh. Dy jarroo, er lhiam dy nee ellyn-erskyn-bree v'ayn, son cha haghyr monney ayns ny skeealyn shen: va taghyrtyn ayn, agh cha dooar mee monney skeeal chamoo aase karracteyr. Er y laue elley, ta Chambers croo yn ennaghtyn dy schlei as ta ny karracteyryn so-chredjal, gyn ourys.

坂本ですが? (佐野 菜見)

Shoh manga aitt mychione scoill - ta, ta fys aym, shen bun dagh ooilley vanga, bunnys! She ynseydagh mie er bashtal eh Sakamoto yn ennym: ard-inçhynagh, gastey, braew, schlei ec dagh ooilley currym. Foddee oo credjal dy beagh ny skeaalyn shoh dree, son shimmey skeeal dree t'ayn mychione ard-charracteyr ta ny ard-oayllee yl-cheirdagh. Agh 'sy chooish shoh, cha voir eh orrym er chor erbee. Er lhiam dy nee forse najooragh t'ayn, ayns ynnyd jeh ard-charracteyr, as ta ard-charracteyr hene ec dagh cabdil, bentyn rish eiyrtys Hakamoto orroosyn. Chammah's shen, ga dy vel eh ard-ghooagh, as ambee mie echey, as mraane cur sou-ghraih er, t'eh scapail ve ny Mary Sue aght ennagh; myr dooyrt mee, cha nel feer vlass Yn Ard-Charracteyr echey. Ghow mee ram soylley jeh'n skeeal shoh. Ta'n Çhapaanish beggan cramp, son she aght aeglee t'ayn son y chooid smoo, agh baghtal dy liooar son y chooid smoo.

RiN (ハロルド 作石)

Shoh skeeal mychione fer aeg by vie lesh screeudeyr manga y ve. Agh, nagh nee Bakuman v'ayn? Cha nel. Ta'n skeeal shoh mychione fer ynrican, as cha nel y chied obbyr echey geddyn y freggyrt millish cheddin as karracteyryn Bakuman noadyr. Er lhiam dy ren eh obbyr vie jeh soilshaghey magh eddyr-obbraghey dagh ooilley charracteyr: lieh-soorey neuaashagh sleih aegey, coloayrtyssyn caarjyn mie, reagheyder ta lhaih jeih kied skeeallyn screeudeyryn-manga-dy-beagh 'sy laa as y screeudeyr hene, lieh-asschaarjys daa 'er aeg... va blass rieughid orroo ooilley, er lhiam.

Er y laue elley, va mee lane fud-y-cheilley rish lhaih y nah skeeal, son she lioar daa skeeal t'ayn. Ta'n snaie elley bentyn rish ben aeg, Rin hene ennym y lioar. Er y fa nagh vel yn Çhapaanish aym flaaoil, meehoig mee hoshiaght. Er lhiam dy row y skeeal ecksh, rere Bakuman, bentyn rish mian dy ve ny ben-chloie ny red ennagh, as nagh row ee shickyr mychione shen; nagh row red ennagh ayn mychione mraane rooshtee as argane marish drogh-'er? Myr shen, er lhiam dy nee reddyn quaagh va taghyrt ayns toshiaght y skeeal. Marranys! Shoh y red: er lhiam dy nee skeeal lane rieughagh v'ayn, bentyn rish sleih cadjin as mianyn cadjin, as cha nee er chor erbee! Ta'n aahilley ec Rin, agh cha doig mee shen derrey jerrey hene yn skeeal. As y fys shen ayms nish, ta'n lane skeeal jannoo keeall dou.

Ny yei shen... v'ad loayrt mychione mraane rooshtee, aghterbee. Cha nee 100% ommidjan t'ayn foast.

Ta'n ellyn mie as rieughagh son y chooid smoo, agh ta blass aitt kiune er. T'eh soilshaghey magh aigney ny karracteyryn liorish caghlaa cummey y reayrtys; myr sampleyr, ta cummey doarneyrys er kied çhaglym Fushimi as y reagheyder.

Fockle s'jerree

Lhaih mee 3 lioaryn, va 144 aym hoshiaght, myr shen ta 141 faagit dou nish. 頑張って!

Kiartaghey: Lhaih mee 3 lioaryn, va 159 aym hoshiaght, myr shen ta 156 faagit dou nish. 頑張って!


English version

The end of week one of the Reading Project. Here's what I've read this week:

The King in Yellow (Robert Chambers)

This book always comes up when talking about weird fiction, fantasy or Lovecraft, so I wanted to try it. It's a decent read, but the stories vary considerably in genre, and I personally found the mix of weird tales and moody historical vignettes rather dissatisfying.

The first four are deeply weird stories. They combine alternative history, a very sinister supernatural, and lyrical writing, with excellent results. All are macabre and intriguing.

The Repairer of Reputations is a really effective tale of the unreliable narrator, which paints a fascinating and alarming picture of madness. It's not until right at the end that you can begin to unravel the complex delusions that intertwine, and find the very foundations of the story are shifting sand. This is already one of my favourite weird tales.

The titular (fictional) play The King in Yellow features in The Yellow Sign. It's actually not such a strange story, essentially a new twist on the supernatural curse. However, it's very well-executed, with compelling writing that really sells the repulsiveness of the watchman, and the dogged thoughts that will not leave our protagonist alone. I confess, though, that all the build-up this story has elsewhere had led me to expect a far weirder tale. The Court of the Dragon, The Mask and The Damoiselle d'Ys are less striking, though all of them are solid supernatural tales. There's a little flavour of the weird to Court, which I liked a great deal, and all are well-written and drew me along easily.

Beyond this, the collection moves into essentially historical writing. The stories retain the underlying grim notes of the early tales; one is about Paris under siege, the others about life in poor Bohemian artists' quarters. The writing remains good, but having come for weirdness I found little to appeal in these. They felt like style over substance, for very little seemed to happen, either in plot or in character development. That being said, they do evoke their atmosphere very effectively.

RiN (ハロルド 作石)

The art in this book is great; clear, crisp, an evocative mixture of realism and impressionistic touches. Perhaps not quite as much to my taste as Obata Takeshi’s work, but very solid. He reskins some scenes to depict emotion, such as painting Fushimi's first encounter with an editor as a boxing match.

The story was, for a Japanese learner, a little harder to follow. It seems to be along the same lines as the excellent Bakuman, following a would-be manga artist’s struggles. Unlike the artistic duo in Bakuman, our hero Fushimi meets with blunt rejection on his first attempt, which is a bit more convincing.

However, this story features a second plot that initially seems entirely separate, featuring what’s presumably our heroine Rin. I confess that I was initially completely baffled by this thread. As far as I could tell, she was ambivalent about possibly becoming a model, or some such thing? I was assuming this would be a mundane story about ordinary people. I worked out only in the last few pages that Rin is, in fact, some kind of psychic or medium, who can see ghosts and/or the future and past. Having worked this out, the story makes a lot more sense. To a fluent reader it should be pretty straightforward, though!

I liked the interactions between characters here. Awkward maybe-flirting teenagers, close friends, bored professionals, would-be agents, I thought they were all pretty convincing.

I’d call this a solid book, with characters I’m happy to follow and a reasonably compelling story, despite my confusion over what that story actually is. I confess that I’m actually *less* interested in the story now that I know it’s got psychics in it, but I’m odd like that, and I’m still pretty interested.

Afterword

I read 3 books, I began with 144, so 141 are left over. 頑張って!

Correction: I read 3 books, I began with 159, so 156 are left over. 頑張って!

Thursday, 1 January 2015

Shalee lhaih 2015: toshiaght

Scroll down or click for English translation

Toshiaght blein noa. Ta mee er ngoaill rish dy vel doilleeid ro-lioarys aym. Reesht. Mollaght orroo.

Ta lioaryn-l jannoo s'crampey y chooish shoh, agh ta mee er nyannoo eab dy howse ny lioaryn t'aym. Ta 144 lioaryn meelhaiht aym ec y traa t'ayn. Atreih, cha noddym jannoo carnane jeu rere yn aght 2013, son ta kuse vooar jeu foast ayns mean ny faarkey vooar er lhong ennagh! As fir elley jeant ass lectraneyn. As y chooid elley ayns kishtaghyn ayns carnane mooar, as cha nel rheamys dy liooar aym ad ooilley y hayrn magh er yn oyr shen ynrican. Wahll, ta shen ny smoo sauçhey aghterbee.

Ta kuse jeu feer ard-scoillaragh, as kuse vooar ayns çhengaghyn joarree. Agh ren mee faagail magh beggan ayns çhengaghyn nagh vel ayms foast! Giootyn, bare dou insh dhyt... Lesh cur geill da slaynt, reddyn elley ry-yannoo as y cleaynys aym lioaryn noa y chionnaghey... t'eh foym y carn shen y yiarrey sheese dys 50 lioaryn rish Blein Noa 2014. Jee, cur niart dou!

As shoh y rolley dhyt:

Australian gothic : an anthology of Australian supernatural fiction, 1867-1939 Doig, James
Australian hauntings : colonial supernatural fiction Doig, James
Stealing the Elf-King's roses Duane, Diane
A wizard abroad Duane, Diane
A Wizard Of Mars Duane, Diane
The wizard's dilemma Duane, Diane
Wizards at war Duane, Diane
Forward the mage Flint, Eric
Structures : or why things don't fall down Gordon, J. E.
Unnatural history Green, Jonathan
The gorgon's head Hawthorne, Nathaniel
The Great Stone Face Hawthorne, Nathaniel
Kwaidan: stories and studies of strange things Hearn, Lafcadio
Morlock Night (Angry Robot) Jeter, K.W.
This is how fucking scary the ocean is Webber, Colleen
A man of means Wodehouse, P. G.
A plague of demons and other stories Laumer, Keith
A prefect's uncle Wodehouse, P. G.
A Prisoner in Fairyland ... Blackwood, A.
A wizard alone Duane, Diane
Aborigine : myths and legends Smith, W. Ramsay
An introduction to Elvish : and to other tongues and proper names and writing systems of the third age of the Western Lands of Middle-Earth as set forth in the published writings of Professor John Ronald Reuel Tolkien Allan, Jim
Aqua 2 (BLADE COMICS) こずえ, 天野
ARIA (4) こずえ, 天野
ARIA 3 (BLADE COMICS) こずえ, 天野
BECAUSE I'M A MAID! Episode 1 Sakai, Sayuri
Caneuon Mynyddog Davies, Mynyddog Richard
Còco is crùbagan = Cocoa and crabs : a hebridean childhood Macdonald, Flora
Cymru, ddoe a heddiw Jenkins, Geraint H.
Cysgod y cryman : nofel Elis, Islwyn Ffowc
Death on the Cherwell Hay, Mavis Doriel
Der goldne Topf : ein Märchen aus der neuen Zeit Hoffmann, Ernst Theodor Amadeus
Dirgelwch yr ogof : nofel am smyglwyr Jones, T. Llew
Endangered Languages Beyond Boundaries: Langues En Peril Au-dela DES Frontieres (Proceedings of the FEL Conference) Norris, Mary Jane
Exploring Japanese literature : read Mishima, Tanizaki and Kawabata in the original Murray, Giles
Fall Beelaa, Lady
Frankenstein Shelley, Mary Wollstonecraft
Friend Island Stevens, Francis
Galwad y blaidd : perthynas y blaidd â Chymru dros y canrifoedd Fychan, Cledwyn
Goblintown Justice (Shotguns & Sorcery) Forbeck, Matt
Hanes Cymru Jones, J. Graham
In search of the unknown Chambers, Robert W.
Indiscretions of Archie Wodehouse, P. G.
Jobnik! : an American girl's adventures in the Israeli army / Miriam Libicki Libicki, Miriam
Jough-laanee aegid as skeealyn elley Lewin, Christopher
Kafka on the shore Murakami, Haruki
Language Endangerment in the 21st Century: Globalisation, Technology and New Media (Proceedings of the Foundation for Endangered Languages) Ka'ai, Tania
Llyfrau darllen newydd. Llyfr 3 Jones, T. Llew
Looking back at Ellesmere Port O'Brien, Pat
Magic below stairs Stevermer, Caroline
Magic for beginners Link, Kelly
Mairelon the magician Wrede, Patricia
Mega fauna Ellis, Jeffrey
Moonlight Kreuz Vol. 1 (Shojo manga) Hazaki, Yasumi
Myth & magic : the art of John Howe Howe, John
Nest Owen, Geraint Dyfnallt
Numenera Cook, Monte
Parzival von Eschenbach, Wolfram
Reading Stories and Learn Chinese, with Free MP3 Li, Jin
Recipes for the Dead #1: Dark Delights with Cranberries Greentea, Vera
Recipes for the Dead #2: Apricot Asylum Greentea, Vera
Recipes for the Dead #3: Steam Minted Meringue Greentea, Vera
RiN (01) ハロルド 作石
R'wbath at yr achos Owen, William
S-Fマガジン 1984年07月号 (通巻314号) 清, 今岡
Short stories in Japanese Emmerich, Michael
Skeealaght: A Book of Short Stories Crellin, Lewis
Skeealyn Crellin, Lewis
Some Chinese ghosts Hearn, Lafcadio
Steampunk Cthulhu: Mythos Terror in the Age of Steam (Chaosium Fiction #6054) Thomas, Jeffrey
Tales of a town. Series 1-3 Carradine, Peter
Tales of St Austin's Wodehouse, P. G.
Terra Benn, Mitch
The citadel of fear Stevens, Francis
The Color of Earth Kim, Dong Hwa
The color of water Kim, Dong Hwa
The Dalesman (issue 1974, March) Various
The gold bat Wodehouse, P. G.
The great short fiction of Alfred Bester. Vol.2, Star light, star bright Bester, Alfred
The head of Kay's Wodehouse, P. G.
The heads of Cerberus Stevens, Francis
The hill of dreams Machen, Arthur
The history of Wirral Grammar School for Boys, 1931-1991 Murphy, Peter W.
The illustrated encyclopaedia of Arthurian legends Coghlan, Ronan
The intrusion of Jimmy Wodehouse, P. G.
The King in Yellow Chambers, Robert W.
The little worm book Ahlberg, Janet
The master of the shell Reed, Talbot Baines
The Mechanical Bard: ninth world tales Fuhrman, Jason
The Night land Hodgson, William Hope
The pothunters Wodehouse, P. G.
The Prince and Betty Wodehouse, P. G.
The romance of the Milky Way, and other studies & stories Hearn, Lafcadio
The Rubáiyát of Omar Khayyám and other Persian poems : an anthology of verse translations Omar Khayyám
The swoop! And other stories Wodehouse, P. G.
The sword of Welleran, and other stories Dunsany, Baron Edward John Moreton Drax Plunkett
The terror; a mystery Machen, Arthur
The white feather Wodehouse, P. G.
The Wirral Home Guard or, The rise and ascent of no. 2 platoon Jager, Harold
Thraxas at War Scott, Martin
Ties of power Czerneda, Julie
Tocyn i'r nefoedd Llewelyn, Dafydd
Two Keys (1) Shoemaker, Chloe Chan and Aliena
Two Keys (2) Chan, Aliena Shoemaker and Chloe
Un nos ola leuad Prichard, Caradog
Underground Liverpool Moore, Jim
View from the Imperium Nye, Jody Lynn
Viking Mersey: Scandinavian Wirral, West Lancashire and Chester Harding, Stephen
Waking in dreamland Nye, Jody Lynn
Waterlogged: tales from the seventh sea Ellis, Jeffrey
エマ (1) (Beam comix) 薫, 森
カッパの飼い方 (1) (ヤングジャンプ・コミックス) 優吾, 石川
クトゥルフと帝国リプレイ 白無垢の仮面 (Role&Roll Books) 靖二郎, 内山
クトゥルフ神話TRPGリプレイ るるいえあんてぃーく (ログインテーブルトークRPGシリーズ) 靖二郎, 内山
クトゥルフ神話TRPGリプレイ るるいえばーすでい (ログインテーブルトークRPGシリーズ) 内山靖二郎
クトゥルフ神話TRPGリプレイ るるいえはいすくーる (ログインテーブルトークRPGシリーズ) 内山靖二郎
クトゥルフ神話TRPGリプレイ るるいえばけーしょん (ログインテーブルトークRPGシリーズ) 内山靖二郎
げんしけん 二代目の四(13) (アフタヌーンKC) 士目, 木尾
げんしけん 二代目の壱(10) (アフタヌーンKC) 士目, 木尾
げんしけん(2) (アフタヌーンKC (1151)) 士目, 木尾
げんしけん(3) (アフタヌーンKC) 士目, 木尾
げんしけん(4) (アフタヌーンKC) 士目, 木尾
ぢごぷり(1) (アフタヌーンKC) 士目, 木尾
ぢごぷり(2) (アフタヌーンKC) 士目, 木尾
つるにょうぼう (日本傑作絵本シリーズ) 澄子, 矢川
ドラえもん 藤子・F・不二雄
ドラえもん (3) (てんとう虫コミックス) 藤子・F・不二雄
バクマン。 (2) (ジャンプ・コミックス) 健, 小畑
バクマン。 1 (ジャンプコミックス) つぐみ, 大場
バクマン。 3 (ジャンプコミックス) つぐみ, 大場
バクマン。 4 (ジャンプコミックス) つぐみ, 大場
バクマン。 5 (ジャンプコミックス) 健, 小畑
ひだまりSchool Life 茶坊, 日暮
ひだまりスケッチ (3) (まんがタイムKRコミックス) うめ, 蒼樹
ひだまりスケッチ (4) (まんがタイムKRコミックス) うめ, 蒼樹
ひだまりスケッチ (5) (まんがタイムKRコミックス) うめ, 蒼樹
ホビットの冒険〈上〉 (岩波少年文庫) トールキン, J.R.R.
モモ (岩波少年文庫(127)) ミヒャエル・エンデ
らんま1/2 (23) (少年サンデーコミックス) 留美子, 高橋
らんま1/2 (24) (少年サンデーコミックス) 留美子, 高橋
らんま1/2 (25) (少年サンデーコミックス) 留美子, 高橋
今日のごはんは?―もう悩まない。いますぐ使える簡単レシピ572日分 (生活実用シリーズ) あきこ, 渡辺
伊斯坦 尔 : 一座城市的记忆 帕慕
僕だけがいない街 (1) けい, 三部
坂本ですが? (01) 佐野 菜見
妖怪のお医者さん(1) (講談社コミックス) 友生, 佐藤
妖怪のお医者さん(2) (講談社コミックス) 友生, 佐藤
学習漫画日本の歴史―集英社版〈4〉さかえる貴族―平安時代 一男, 笠原
爱丽丝漫游奇境记 / Ài​lì​sī​ màn​yóu​ qí​jìng ​jì Carroll, Lewis
猫の事務所 (日本の童話名作選) 賢治, 宮沢
田中くんはいつもけだるげ(1) (ガンガンコミックスONLINE) ノゾミ, ウダ
绿宝石阴谋 Fowler, Mark
聲の形(1) 大今良時
行书笔法与临写结构与章法 杨,再春
西游记 吴承恩
金魚屋古書店 1 せいむ, 芳崎
金魚屋古書店 2 せいむ, 芳崎
金魚屋古書店 3 せいむ, 芳崎
魔法使いの嫁 1 (コミックブレイド) ヤマザキコレ

Nee'm my chooid share! As screeu barelyn jeh ny lioaryn shoh heose, my ta caa aym.


English version

A new year begins. I've already admitted that I have a problem of book over-abundance. Again. Pants.

Ebooks are causing complications, but I reckon I currrently have 144 unread books. As many of them are still on boats in the middle of the Pacific, or exist only as data (and the rest are currently jammed into boxes crammed into cupboards and I don't have room to unpack everything just for something like this) I can't actually make them into a huge pile, as I unwisely did in 2013. It's probably for the best.

Quite a few are in foreign languages or very technical. I've left out a couple in languages I don't actually speak - presents, let me add! Bearing in mind health issues, other things to do, and an unquenchable urge to buy more books... I'm aiming to cut the pile down to 50 books by this time next year. Ouch.

Hey, here's a list for you:

Australian gothic : an anthology of Australian supernatural fiction, 1867-1939 Doig, James
Australian hauntings : colonial supernatural fiction Doig, James
Stealing the Elf-King's roses Duane, Diane
A wizard abroad Duane, Diane
A Wizard Of Mars Duane, Diane
The wizard's dilemma Duane, Diane
Wizards at war Duane, Diane
Forward the mage Flint, Eric
Structures : or why things don't fall down Gordon, J. E.
Unnatural history Green, Jonathan
The gorgon's head Hawthorne, Nathaniel
The Great Stone Face Hawthorne, Nathaniel
Kwaidan: stories and studies of strange things Hearn, Lafcadio
Morlock Night (Angry Robot) Jeter, K.W.
This is how fucking scary the ocean is Webber, Colleen
A man of means Wodehouse, P. G.
A plague of demons and other stories Laumer, Keith
A prefect's uncle Wodehouse, P. G.
A Prisoner in Fairyland ... Blackwood, A.
A wizard alone Duane, Diane
Aborigine : myths and legends Smith, W. Ramsay
An introduction to Elvish : and to other tongues and proper names and writing systems of the third age of the Western Lands of Middle-Earth as set forth in the published writings of Professor John Ronald Reuel Tolkien Allan, Jim
Aqua 2 (BLADE COMICS) こずえ, 天野
ARIA (4) こずえ, 天野
ARIA 3 (BLADE COMICS) こずえ, 天野
BECAUSE I'M A MAID! Episode 1 Sakai, Sayuri
Caneuon Mynyddog Davies, Mynyddog Richard
Còco is crùbagan = Cocoa and crabs : a hebridean childhood Macdonald, Flora
Cymru, ddoe a heddiw Jenkins, Geraint H.
Cysgod y cryman : nofel Elis, Islwyn Ffowc
Death on the Cherwell Hay, Mavis Doriel
Der goldne Topf : ein Märchen aus der neuen Zeit Hoffmann, Ernst Theodor Amadeus
Dirgelwch yr ogof : nofel am smyglwyr Jones, T. Llew
Endangered Languages Beyond Boundaries: Langues En Peril Au-dela DES Frontieres (Proceedings of the FEL Conference) Norris, Mary Jane
Exploring Japanese literature : read Mishima, Tanizaki and Kawabata in the original Murray, Giles
Fall Beelaa, Lady
Frankenstein Shelley, Mary Wollstonecraft
Friend Island Stevens, Francis
Galwad y blaidd : perthynas y blaidd â Chymru dros y canrifoedd Fychan, Cledwyn
Goblintown Justice (Shotguns & Sorcery) Forbeck, Matt
Hanes Cymru Jones, J. Graham
In search of the unknown Chambers, Robert W.
Indiscretions of Archie Wodehouse, P. G.
Jobnik! : an American girl's adventures in the Israeli army / Miriam Libicki Libicki, Miriam
Jough-laanee aegid as skeealyn elley Lewin, Christopher
Kafka on the shore Murakami, Haruki
Language Endangerment in the 21st Century: Globalisation, Technology and New Media (Proceedings of the Foundation for Endangered Languages) Ka'ai, Tania
Llyfrau darllen newydd. Llyfr 3 Jones, T. Llew
Looking back at Ellesmere Port O'Brien, Pat
Magic below stairs Stevermer, Caroline
Magic for beginners Link, Kelly
Mairelon the magician Wrede, Patricia
Mega fauna Ellis, Jeffrey
Moonlight Kreuz Vol. 1 (Shojo manga) Hazaki, Yasumi
Myth & magic : the art of John Howe Howe, John
Nest Owen, Geraint Dyfnallt
Numenera Cook, Monte
Parzival von Eschenbach, Wolfram
Reading Stories and Learn Chinese, with Free MP3 Li, Jin
Recipes for the Dead #1: Dark Delights with Cranberries Greentea, Vera
Recipes for the Dead #2: Apricot Asylum Greentea, Vera
Recipes for the Dead #3: Steam Minted Meringue Greentea, Vera
RiN (01) ハロルド 作石
R'wbath at yr achos Owen, William
S-Fマガジン 1984年07月号 (通巻314号) 清, 今岡
Short stories in Japanese Emmerich, Michael
Skeealaght: A Book of Short Stories Crellin, Lewis
Skeealyn Crellin, Lewis
Some Chinese ghosts Hearn, Lafcadio
Steampunk Cthulhu: Mythos Terror in the Age of Steam (Chaosium Fiction #6054) Thomas, Jeffrey
Tales of a town. Series 1-3 Carradine, Peter
Tales of St Austin's Wodehouse, P. G.
Terra Benn, Mitch
The citadel of fear Stevens, Francis
The Color of Earth Kim, Dong Hwa
The color of water Kim, Dong Hwa
The Dalesman (issue 1974, March) Various
The gold bat Wodehouse, P. G.
The great short fiction of Alfred Bester. Vol.2, Star light, star bright Bester, Alfred
The head of Kay's Wodehouse, P. G.
The heads of Cerberus Stevens, Francis
The hill of dreams Machen, Arthur
The history of Wirral Grammar School for Boys, 1931-1991 Murphy, Peter W.
The illustrated encyclopaedia of Arthurian legends Coghlan, Ronan
The intrusion of Jimmy Wodehouse, P. G.
The King in Yellow Chambers, Robert W.
The little worm book Ahlberg, Janet
The master of the shell Reed, Talbot Baines
The Mechanical Bard: ninth world tales Fuhrman, Jason
The Night land Hodgson, William Hope
The pothunters Wodehouse, P. G.
The Prince and Betty Wodehouse, P. G.
The romance of the Milky Way, and other studies & stories Hearn, Lafcadio
The Rubáiyát of Omar Khayyám and other Persian poems : an anthology of verse translations Omar Khayyám
The swoop! And other stories Wodehouse, P. G.
The sword of Welleran, and other stories Dunsany, Baron Edward John Moreton Drax Plunkett
The terror; a mystery Machen, Arthur
The white feather Wodehouse, P. G.
The Wirral Home Guard or, The rise and ascent of no. 2 platoon Jager, Harold
Thraxas at War Scott, Martin
Ties of power Czerneda, Julie
Tocyn i'r nefoedd Llewelyn, Dafydd
Two Keys (1) Shoemaker, Chloe Chan and Aliena
Two Keys (2) Chan, Aliena Shoemaker and Chloe
Un nos ola leuad Prichard, Caradog
Underground Liverpool Moore, Jim
View from the Imperium Nye, Jody Lynn
Viking Mersey: Scandinavian Wirral, West Lancashire and Chester Harding, Stephen
Waking in dreamland Nye, Jody Lynn
Waterlogged: tales from the seventh sea Ellis, Jeffrey
エマ (1) (Beam comix) 薫, 森
カッパの飼い方 (1) (ヤングジャンプ・コミックス) 優吾, 石川
クトゥルフと帝国リプレイ 白無垢の仮面 (Role&Roll Books) 靖二郎, 内山
クトゥルフ神話TRPGリプレイ るるいえあんてぃーく (ログインテーブルトークRPGシリーズ) 靖二郎, 内山
クトゥルフ神話TRPGリプレイ るるいえばーすでい (ログインテーブルトークRPGシリーズ) 内山靖二郎
クトゥルフ神話TRPGリプレイ るるいえはいすくーる (ログインテーブルトークRPGシリーズ) 内山靖二郎
クトゥルフ神話TRPGリプレイ るるいえばけーしょん (ログインテーブルトークRPGシリーズ) 内山靖二郎
げんしけん 二代目の四(13) (アフタヌーンKC) 士目, 木尾
げんしけん 二代目の壱(10) (アフタヌーンKC) 士目, 木尾
げんしけん(2) (アフタヌーンKC (1151)) 士目, 木尾
げんしけん(3) (アフタヌーンKC) 士目, 木尾
げんしけん(4) (アフタヌーンKC) 士目, 木尾
ぢごぷり(1) (アフタヌーンKC) 士目, 木尾
ぢごぷり(2) (アフタヌーンKC) 士目, 木尾
つるにょうぼう (日本傑作絵本シリーズ) 澄子, 矢川
ドラえもん 藤子・F・不二雄
ドラえもん (3) (てんとう虫コミックス) 藤子・F・不二雄
バクマン。 (2) (ジャンプ・コミックス) 健, 小畑
バクマン。 1 (ジャンプコミックス) つぐみ, 大場
バクマン。 3 (ジャンプコミックス) つぐみ, 大場
バクマン。 4 (ジャンプコミックス) つぐみ, 大場
バクマン。 5 (ジャンプコミックス) 健, 小畑
ひだまりSchool Life 茶坊, 日暮
ひだまりスケッチ (3) (まんがタイムKRコミックス) うめ, 蒼樹
ひだまりスケッチ (4) (まんがタイムKRコミックス) うめ, 蒼樹
ひだまりスケッチ (5) (まんがタイムKRコミックス) うめ, 蒼樹
ホビットの冒険〈上〉 (岩波少年文庫) トールキン, J.R.R.
モモ (岩波少年文庫(127)) ミヒャエル・エンデ
らんま1/2 (23) (少年サンデーコミックス) 留美子, 高橋
らんま1/2 (24) (少年サンデーコミックス) 留美子, 高橋
らんま1/2 (25) (少年サンデーコミックス) 留美子, 高橋
今日のごはんは?―もう悩まない。いますぐ使える簡単レシピ572日分 (生活実用シリーズ) あきこ, 渡辺
伊斯坦 尔 : 一座城市的记忆 帕慕
僕だけがいない街 (1) けい, 三部
坂本ですが? (01) 佐野 菜見
妖怪のお医者さん(1) (講談社コミックス) 友生, 佐藤
妖怪のお医者さん(2) (講談社コミックス) 友生, 佐藤
学習漫画日本の歴史―集英社版〈4〉さかえる貴族―平安時代 一男, 笠原
爱丽丝漫游奇境记 / Ài​lì​sī​ màn​yóu​ qí​jìng ​jì Carroll, Lewis
猫の事務所 (日本の童話名作選) 賢治, 宮沢
田中くんはいつもけだるげ(1) (ガンガンコミックスONLINE) ノゾミ, ウダ
绿宝石阴谋 Fowler, Mark
聲の形(1) 大今良時
行书笔法与临写结构与章法 杨,再春
西游记 吴承恩
金魚屋古書店 1 せいむ, 芳崎
金魚屋古書店 2 せいむ, 芳崎
金魚屋古書店 3 せいむ, 芳崎
魔法使いの嫁 1 (コミックブレイド) ヤマザキコレ

I'll do my best, and as previously, try to write reviews as I go.

Wednesday, 31 December 2014

Shaleeyn 2015

As shoh 2015!

Daa vlein erash, chooilleen mee yn Çhalee Lhaih as giarrey y carnane lioaryn ry-lhaih aym sheese dys 50. Cre'n obbyr noa ta foym?

Wahll, ta'n carnane erash. Kyndagh rhym cummal 'syn Çhapaan rish shey meeghyn, ta ymmodee lioaryn aym reesht, as cooid vooad jeu 'syn Çhapaanish. By vie lhiam, reesht, giarrey shen dys 50.

Chammah's shen, ta ymmodee filmyn aym er JABE, son s'mie lesh sleih elley cur JABEyn dou. By vie lhiam cooid vooar jeu y 'akin as ceau magh, giarrey eh dys 20 foddee. Ta mee foast geddyn jyskyn dagh mee liorish Lovefilm, myr shen nar lhig dooin reih dean neuyannooagh.

Cur jerrey er Dreadfleet. Ta mee foast troggal yn gamman shoh hooar mee daa ny tree bleeantyn erash! By vie lhiam eh y chloie laa ennagh!

As erskyn shen, cur lhiam fer jeh ny shaleeyn screeuee aym dys stayd cooilleenit. Gamman, skeeal, red erbee dy jarroo. Ta mooarane jeu ayn. By vie lhiam jerrey er red ennagh y chur mleeaney.

...oh, as feddyn staartey. Shen scanshoil, dy jarroo.


Hello 2015!

Two years ago, I completed the Reading Project and hacked my pile of unread books down to 50. What's new for 2015?

Well, sadly, the mountain is back. Especially due to me living in Japan for 6 months, I once again have too many unread books, many of them now in Japanese. I'd like to once again get that down to 50, though it's a big task.

That not being enough, I also have rather too many films on DVD, since people tend to give me those. I'd like to watch and dispose of a good chunk of those to clear space. Maybe down to 20 or so? I still get monthly DVDs from Lovefilm too, so let's not get too ambitious.

Finish painting Dreadfleet. I've been assembling this board game for a couple of years now, though there are many reasons for this. Nevertheless, I'd like to actually play it one day!

And above that, I'd really like to get one of my myriad writing projects to a finished state. A game, a story, anything really. I have so many on the boil, half-done. I'd like to get something accomplished this year.

...oh, and I should really find a job. That's pretty important.

Sunday, 16 November 2014

Baase Phan

Tra rosh ny turryssee Lunninagh Arcady, ren ad dobberan, yn derrey yeh gys y jeh elley, mychione baase Phan. As drasteyn honnick ad eshyn, ny lhie stark as taaue. Cha darree Pan ny h-Eairkyn, as va'n fynney echey fo druight; cha row cummey baagh bio er. As eisht dooyrt ad, "S'feer eh dy vel Pan marroo."

As, nyn shassoo dooagh rish y chorp foawragh ny lhie, yeeagh ad rish foddey dy hraa ec Pan imraagh.

As haink fastyr, as haink rish rollage beg.

As ny sheyn, ass claghan glioon Arcadagh ennagh, haink doodeeyn Arcadagh as adsyn goaill arrane eddrym.

As tra yeeagh ad ersyn, er y çhenn Jee ny lhie 'sy cheeiraght, scuirr ad as loayrt rish y cheilley myr sannish. "Nagh ommidjagh y cummey t'er," as ad, as gearey dy feagh lesh shen.

As rish sheean gearey, ren Pan lheimmey seose, as va'n garvel skeaylt ec e chrubbyn.

As choud cheddin as hannee ny turrysee nyn shassoo as eaishtagh rish, va sheeanyn eiyrtys gennal aavuilley jeh carrickyn as mullee Arcady.


Ta'n skeealeen shoh çhyndaait ass The Death of Pan liorish yn Çhiarn Dunsany. Ta'n lioar vunneydagh ry-lhaih er Project Gutenberg.

Wednesday, 22 October 2014

Ny Tree Mec Vooarey

As fy-yerrey hrog Deiney er ard gloyr s'jerree ard-veenid, troggal smoo ny caayrey yerrinagh.

Ayns duinid thallooin foddey foue, ren jeshaghtyn cronnane rish cooilleeney dagh ooilley feme v'oc; cha row laboraght erbee ry-yannoo ec Deiney. Ghow ad aash nyn soie, as coloayrt er yn 'Eysht Keintys.

As nish as reesht, ass magheryn jarroodit, haink shenn ven voght as shirrey jeirk. Haink ee dy doccaragh dys y dorrys sodjey magh, dys arragh sodjey ghloyr yerrinagh Gheiney. As dagh cheayrt hug ad cooyl ee. Cha row y chaayr shoh, ard-obbyr Gheiney, cooie jee.

She Najoor haink shirrey jeirk ass my magheryn, as hug ad cooyl ee dagh keayrt.

As ersooyl lhee reesht dys ny magheryn.

As laa dy row haink ee reesht, as reesht ren ad dy jiooley. Agh haink tree mec vooarey mâree.

"Hie stiagh adsyn," as ish. "Adsyn my vec, stiagh 'sy chaayr eu."

As hie stiagh ny tree mec vooarey.

As shoh mec Najoor, cloan agglagh y ven hreigit: Caggey, Genney as Plaih.

Dy jarroo, hie ad stiagh as feddyn Deiney gyn yss 'sy chaayr oc; foast smooinaghtyn er ny Feyshtyn oc, lhiantyn hug yn ard-veenid oc, gyn eer clashtyn rish y cheimnaghey as ad nyn dree tayrn faggys daue.


Ta'n skeealeen shoh çhyndaait ass The Three Tall Sons liorish yn Çhiarn Dunsany. Ta'n lioar vunneydagh ry-lhaih er Project Gutenberg.

Monday, 6 October 2014

Yn Scaa Harrish Innsmouth: cleayney Zadok Allen

Shegin da teaym roonagh ennagh—ny cleayn sharroo er bun dorraghey follit—er chur orrym caghlaa yn aigney v’orrym. Va mee er giarail rish foddey nagh derrin geill agh da seyrnaght hene, as ec y traa shid hene va mee jannoo siyr cour Kerrin y Valley myr eab dy hirrey arraghey leah ass y valley yngyragh baaish as loau. Aght ennagh, tra honnick mee shenn Zadok Allen, haink rish strooanyn noa ‘syn aigney aym, as ren mee feiyal as mish neuhickyr.

Va’n aeglan er my hickyraghey nagh niarragh y shenn dooinney agh sannishyn keoie brisht er skeealyn erskyn credjue sheelt. Harrish shen, v’eh er chur raaue dou nagh beagh eh sauçhey loayrt rish dy vaikagh ynnydee erbee shen. Ny yei shen, va’n shenn ‘eanishagh jeh fioghey y valley ny violagh nagh dod mee shassoo n’oi. Va’n cooinaghtyn echey roshtyn erash dys eashyn lhongyn as thieyn-obbree; son nagh vel beeal-arrish whaagh cheoie dy mennick ny cochaslys chowreydagh er bun cree firrinagh? Shegin da’n shenn ‘er er vakin dagh ooilley chooish Innsmouth rish jeih bleeaney as kiare feed. Ghooisht accrys scoillaragh aynym ny stroshey na keeal as arrey; as corvian aegid orrym, heill mee dy noddin creearey cree shennaghys hene ass y deayrtey breagagh fud-y-cheilley darragh jeh, gyn ourys, fo greim jough lajer.

Hoig mee nagh dod mee loayrt rish ‘syn ynnyd shen, son gyn ourys veagh ny firvooghee shassoo noi. Ny share yinnin aarlaghey son y obbyr, er lhiam. Va’n guilley groseyragh er ninsh dou c’raad va jough smugglit ry-gheddyn gyn boirey, as chionneein boteil ny ghaa. Eisht, yinnin streeley gyn dean baghtal faggys da thie ny firvooghee, as çheet cooidjagh Zadok erreish da goaill toshiaght rouail reesht. Va’n fer aeg er ninsh dou dy nee dooinney graue-aashagh v’ayn, as nagh b’oayllagh da soie harrish oor ny ghaa ‘syn oayll.

Hooar mee boteil dy ushtey bea dy aashagh, agh er leagh mooar, ec yl-stoyr dullyr ayns Eliot Street faggys da’n Cherroo. Va blass “jeeagh Innsmouth” bolg-hooillagh er y dooinney sallagh chreck eh dou, agh va aght beasagh echey. Er lhiam dy b’oayllagh da lheid y dooinney bentyn rish ny fir yoarree ghoan haink dys y valley—immanee lorree, kionneyderyn airhey as fir ghennal myr shen magh.

Tra haink mee erash, hooar mee dy row yn aigh marym, son honnick mee cummey fritlag hang dy ghooinney stroogey e chassyn ass Paine Street mygeayrt corneil Hie Ghilman: Zadok Allen hene. Rere y phlann aym, hayrn mee e yeill liorish leaystey y boteil noa v’aym dy erreayrtagh. Dy leah, hoig mee dy row eh spaagail my yei as jeeagh yeearreeagh er. Hooill mee trooid Waite Street cour yn ard smoo lomarcan as fys aym er.

Va mee reih coorse rere y chaslys-balley ren y guilley groseyragh dou. V’eh foym roshtyn çheu jiass ny marrey, as ish lane treigit tra hug mee shilley urree hoshiaght. Cha row mee er vakin peiagh erbee agh ny yeeasteyryn er y challoo foddey; as dy raghin kerroo ny ghaa elley, veign ass yn shilley ocsyn myrgeddin. Yinnin shirrey soieag er keiy lomarcan ennagh, as feyshtey shenn Zadok choud’s by vie lhiam, gyn boirey er tastey ny h-ynnydee baggyrtagh. Roish my rosh mee Main Street, cheayll mee “Hoi, y ghooinney!” peeaghaneagh my yei, as dy leah lhig mee da tayrn ry-lhiattee as sluggey bolgum jeean ny ghaa jeh'n voteil.

As shinyn shooyl harrish Water Street as çhyndaa my yiass, trooid ooilley-traartys as tholtaneyn corragh meshtallagh, ghow mee toshiaght cur magh brod meein ny ghaa. Hooar mee nagh beagh y çhengey seyrey cho aashagh as shen. Fy-yerrey, honnick mee clash faiyragh cour yn ‘aarkey eddyr boallaghyn breekey kynneigagh. Heeyn keiy thallooin-as-cloaie ny yei, fo harkil; va carnyn cloaie fo cheynnagh ayn myr soiaegyn, as va thie stoyr brisht ‘sy twoaie ny scaa mie noi shilley peiagh erbee. Shoh, er lhiam, ynnyd slanjeant son cohaggloo folliaghtagh liauyr, as myr shen ren mee stiurey Zadok sheese y raad as teiy ynnyd cooie mastey ny claghyn. Va blass gowlagh baaish as treigeilys ‘sy voayl, as soar yeeastagh by ghoillee dou shassoo noi; agh va aigney fondagh aym gyn lhiggey daue my chumrail.

As mish son faagail er barroose hoght er y chlag, va mysh kiare ooryn ain son coloayrtys. Hug mee ny smoo jough lajer da’n shenn sooder, as ee my chirbyl goan hene. Ghow mee kiarail gyn deayrtey rouyr; va mee shirrey tagglooaght y jough, as voir mee dy darragh thollaneys ersyn. Rish oor, er lhiam dy row y fastaght sleetçhagh lheie ersooyl beggan er veggan, agh v’eh foast my volley as shaghney feyshtyn erbee er shennaghys dorraghey Innsmouth. Share da loayrt er cooishyn jeianagh; va fys fondagh echey er ny pabyryn-naight, as beoyn lajer er son fallsoonys giare-ocklagh y valley beg çheerey.

Rish jerrey y naa laa, va drogh-ourys orrym nagh beagh kerroo dy ushtey bea cooilleeney’n obbyr, as va mee smooinaghtyn dy nhare dou faagail y dooinney as kionnaghey boteil elley. Agh eisht, trooid taghyrt hene, haink y caa nagh dod mee jannoo jeh yioin, as haink bree noa stiagh ayns mungley y shenn ‘er peeaghanagh hug orrym croymmey dy chlashtyn rish. Va’n cooyl aym cour y cheayn yeeastagh, agh v’eshyn jeeragh urree; as aght ennagh va’n sooill echey er soiaghey er linney injil foddey Sker y Jouyll, as ish ry-akin dy baghtal—tayrnagh, bunnys—erskyn ny tonnyn. Hug y reayrtys shen meehaitnys er, as ghow eh toshiaght guee mollaghtyn faase urree, derrey lheie ny focklyn ersooyl myr sannish folliaghtagh as sooill toiggalagh. Chroym eh roym as goaill greim er yn ‘iltag aym, as fockley magh sannish nagh noddagh oo meehoiggal eh.

Saturday, 30 August 2014

Just how much do they want language skills?

English is here: English version

Hooar mee daa art er y Guardian er y gherrid. Va’n jees oc mychione shirrey staarey, as anaasoil dy liooar, as by vie lhiam loayrt orroo began. Shoh y chied.

Shoh eh: My languages guilt: am I making the most of my degree?. Ga dy vel mee currit da çhengaghyn, cha nel keim ollooscoillagh ayns çhengaghyn aym, myr shen she smooinaght as tastey t’ayn heese, cha nee keeayl chionnit.

Six months after graduating, I found myself working as a server in the kitchen of a country hotel. I was not even allowed to take orders from customers, such was my meagre role. The only time my language skills came in useful was when the French pastry chef berated me for getting in his way.

The recently departed education secretary, Michael Gove, underlined how important languages are. He said: "There is a slam-dunk case for extending foreign language teaching to children aged five.

Agh myr t’ee soilshaghey magh, ta cooid smoo jeu feddyn staartaghyn nagh vel ‘staartaghyn çhengaghyn’ hene. T’ad gobbraghey ‘sy leigh, argidys, margeeys, soilshaghey magh lioaryn, ny reirey. Cha nel yn ughtar gra nagh vel ad cooie da keimagh çhengey noadyr. Rere y bun-resooney eck, cha nee schlei çhengaghyn ta lhiggey daue geddyn lheid ny staartaghyn – she keim erbee, schleiyn yn-astreeaghey, as dy mennick, prowal obbyr (‘work experience’).

My ta shen feer, cre’n fa dy vel wheesh dy leih cur trimmid er ard-scansh çhengaghyn da farrys ny çheerey, as shassoo er dy vel failleyderyn jeean son sleih as ablid çhengaghyn oc? Nagh vel lheid ny h-obbree jeeaghyn er ny staartaghyn kiart as cooie? Er y laue elley, vel staartaghyn ass towse ry-gheddyn ec yl-hengee gyn keim ayns çhengaghyn?

Dy jarroo, smoo doillee da keimee hengey feddyn staartey (DLHE taabyl E) na keimee oyraghyn elley. Cha nel agh shennaghys, fallsoonys as y leigh ny smessey, as son y chooid smoo, shegin da leighderyn jannoo studeyrts elley roish my nod ad geddyn staartey ‘sy leigh.

I remember that when I graduated, I was faced with a blanket of nothingness; the only options in front of me were the competitive graduate schemes (most of which required that I sit some kind of maths test which I was almost guaranteed to fail), a masters (I'd had enough of studying for the time being), target-hitting sales roles (not for a person who finds it hard to say no), or teaching. None of that appealed. I felt betrayed.

Shoh doilleeid ainjyssagh dou. Er lhiam dy vel politickeyryn, çhynskyleyryn as lheid ny fir vooarey boirey er schlei çhengaghyn ‘sy aght cheddin as caghlaa emshyraght. Dy ghra myr shen: ta ennaghtyn dy liooar oc dy vel ad loayrt er ard er trimmid y doilleeid; t’ad shassoo er dy vel eh lane scanshoil dy vel sleih elley jannoo nyn gooid share dy chaghlaa y chooish; as t’ad jannoo obbyr chowreydagh nish as reesht dys cowraghey magh, “jeeagh, ta mee boirey er y chooish!”. Agh s’goan ass towse dy vel peiagh erbee as cummaght oc jannoo red erbee feeu dy chaghlaa y chooish.

Rere jerkallys, she argid t’ayn son y chooid smoo, er lhiam.

Tarmaynys as çhengaghyn

My ta failleyderyn cur tastey erbee da’n chooish, t’ad er son skimmee yl-hengagh, gyn ourys. Cre’n argane t’ayn? My t’ou dty obbree chadjin, t’eh cooney lhiat dellal rish cliantyn as custymeyryn ass çheeraghyn elley. My t’ou gobbraghey er cooishyn leighoil, t’eh coontey lhiat jannoo conaantyn fondagh marish cliantyn ny lughtyn-dellal elley. My t’ou dellal rish margeeys ny creck reddyn, t’eh cooney lhiat ardjaghey troaryn, shickyraghey studeyryn-ry-heet, tayrn tastey buird scrutee as shaleeyn oc ry-hebbal, as myr shen magh. My she kiarail-chustymeyryn t’ayn, t’eh ny sassey dhyt blandeyragh custymeyryn, feaysley magh doilleeidyn, cosney treisht as myr shen. My she ronsaghey ny shirveishyn-fysseree t’ayn, t’eh lhiggey dhyt toiggal rheamys smoo dy chooid, as myr shen, t’eh ny sassey feddyn fysseree er lheh, chammah’s cummal seose rish y traa t’ayn. My she ym-ysseraght, foddee oo loayrt dy jeeragh rish shirveishtyn-naightey ayns çheeraghyn as çhengaghyn elley; t’eh shaghney çhyndaays mee chiart ny daa-cheayllagh, as reddyn meevaynrey, as share lesh sleih my t’ou cur freggyrt jeeragh daue.

Chammah’s ooilley shen, my ta çhengey elley oc, s’cosoylagh dy vel oo heose rish cooishyn çheumooie jeh Cryss ny Baarle, as foddee oo feddyn magh fys ny caaghyn vondeishagh da’n cholught.

Ny smoo na shen, cha nel neuvondeish erbee ayn! Ta ablidyn elley doillee ny keayrtyn. Ta hene-barrantys jannoo fer toshee mie jeed, as foddee dy vel oo creck ram stoo, ny jannoo conaantyn vondeishagh er y fa shen. Er y laue elley, ta ro-hickyrys ny vun marranys myrgeddin: shimmey tonn eddyr y lhong as y traie. Ta ablid co-earrooderyn slane femoil, agh shegin dhyt ynsaghey reddyn noa dy mennick, as ta shen deyr. Cha nel neuvondeish erbee da skimmee daa-hengagh, goaill rish dy vel Baarle (ny Gaelg, ny çhengey erbee y cholught) ‘laaoil oc.

Gow rish failleyderyn yn ablid shen as ad maynrey. Agh cha nel ad son eeck er e hon.

Er lhiam, er lesh failleyderyn, dy nee “schlei neufondagh” ad çhengaghyn. Shimmey ablid scanshoil elley ta “neufondagh” myrgeddin. Smooinee er schlei “eddyr-phersoonagh” myr sampleyr. T’ou jannoo ymmyd jeu ‘syn obbyr son dy loayrt rish custymeyryn, kiunaghey sleih tra ta doilleeid ayn, tayrn as shickyraghey cliantyn a.r.e. (as son politickaght obbree!) . Agh ta laue foddey ny smoo oc, son shoh yn ablid ta croo coardailys as maynrys ‘sy cholught, as shimmey eiyrtys mie ta geiyrt orroo: creeaght, troaraght, coyrle mie, sharaghey obbraghyn, injillaghey asslaynt obbree, a.r.e. Atreih, cha nod oo towse ad dy mie, ny cur leagh fondagh er lheid yn ablid. Er y fa shen, s’goan dy vel sleih goaill rish, ny cur tastey da rish listal obbree noa (shegin dhyt gra dy vel ad oc, agh quoi ec ta fys?), ny faill er nyn son.

As ablid çhengey myrgeddin. Dy jarroo, she red mie dy vel 20 çhengey ec y skimmee (goaill rish dy vel un cho-hengey eddyr oc!); agh mannagh vel y colught lane churrit da obbraghey eddyrashoonagh, ny cliantyn ass çheeraghyn elley, ny dellal rish ram cooid ayns çhengaghyn joarree, she red mie t’ayn as shen ooilley. Foddee dy bee vondeish echey nish as reesht, agh vondeish beg. Abbyr dy vel y reireyder stoyr-fysseree ny lhee-coonee as teisht eck, ny dy nod y screeudeyr imman lorree. Nee oo shirrey orroo jannoo ymmyd jeh’n ablid shen nish as reesht, foddee, agh cha nee oo cur eh er y chonaant obbree, chamoo eeck da er ny hon agh ny keayrtyn shen.

Co-ennaghtyn marish y jouyl

Cha nel mee jannoo cassid er ny failleyderyn edyr. Mannagh vel çhengaghyn lane femoil da staartey, cha nel eh keeayll dy chur ablid çhengaghyn 'sy choontey staartey. Mannagh vel ablid 'sy choontey staartey, cha nel eh ort jannoo ymmyd jeh, chamoo yiow oo faill er e hon. 'Syn 'eill, t'eh çheet dy ve neuvaghtal; ta taghyrtyn ayn tra nee oo ymmyd jeh'n ablid ga nagh vel eh "femoil", son ta'n ablid ayds as t'eh jannoo ny sassey ny t'ort jannoo eh. Dy jarroo, ta ablidyn ayn s'mie lesh sleih jannoo ymmyd jeu (goaill stiagh çhengaghyn, co-earrooaght, as ellyn dy mennick) son t'ad goaill soylley jeu, as nee ad ymmyd jeu ga nagh vel ad cosney argid lioroo.

Er y laue elley, lhisagh failleyder cur sar-'aill dou er y fa dy vel ablid çhengey aym as dy vel mee jannoo ymmyd jeh 'syn obbyr nish as reesht - ga nagh hirr ad lheid yn ablid as nagh vel eh femoil son jannoo y staartey? Cha nel shen keeall. Ny keayrtyn, my ta ablid çhengey ec yn obbree, ta'n colught çheet dy yerkal rish shen as jannoo ram ymmyd jeh'n ablid shen nagh vel oo faillit er e hon, as t'eh çheet dy ve cramp. Ayns colught traghtee, ta faill so-lhoobagh as yn-argane dy mennick, as myr shen foddee oo aggyrt da'n reireydys dy vel eh orroo cur sur-lhieeney dhyt son yn ablid shen, son tra ghow oo rish yn 'aill aaragh, cha ren eh goaill stiagh yn ablid shen. Ayns commyn y theay, ta corys-faill soit son y chooid smoo, as cha nel ad so-lhoobagh er chor erbee (wahll... son sleih beggey). Dy cadjin, ta ablidyn as obbraghyn kianglt rish keim 'aill; as ny keayrtyn, lhisagh y curmeyder lhiettal uss veih jannoo ymmyd jeh ablid ennagh, er nonney veagh eh orroo y cheim ayd y ardjaghey!

As mish gobbbraghey ayns lioarlann ollooscoillagh, ren mee ram ymmyd jeh ny çhengaghyn aym ga nagh vel mee flaaoil er chor erbee. Shimmey peiagh v'ayn ass yn Ghermaan ny'n Çheen. Dy jarroo, va Baarle yindyssagh oc son y chooid smoo, agh ny yei shen bare lesh kuse jeu loayrt y çhengey ghooie oc marym. Va kuse elley jannoo ronsaghey shallidagh, as cha row Baarle flaaoil oc; myr shen v'eh share çhengey elley y loayrt. Erskyn shen, ta sar-tasht-fockle quaagh ec ollooscoillyn, as ec lioarlannyn, as ec lioarlannyn ollooscoillagh erskyn ooilley. Dy cadjin, cha nel sar-fockle goan ennagh (ny ymmyd er lheh jeh) er enney ec sleih ass çheer elley. Dy jarroo, v'eh doillee dy liooar dauesyn as Baarle ghooie oc, ny keayrtyn! 'Sy chooish shoh, she red mooar eh çhengey elley y loayrt. Dod mish ynsaghey y tasht-fockle cooie 'sy çhengey, as eisht dod mee soilshaghey cooishyn crampey da ymmodee sleih ga nagh row y tasht-fockle shen oc 'sy Vaarle - wahll, derrey dynsee mee ny focklyn daue. Chammah's shen, va lioaryn ayns çhengaghyn elley ain, as myr shen dod mee gobbraghey orroo ny s'tappee na co-obbree elley. Row feme er ny çhengaghyn shen son y staartey aym? Cha row, gyn ourys. Agh er y fa dy vel ad aym, dod mee cur shirveish share da co-obbree as cliantyn? Gyn ourys.

Ta mee er nobbraghey 'sy voayl rish shey bleeantyn. Ta sleih cliaghtit rish yn eie dy vel peiagh ry-gheddyn as y çhengey shoh ny shen aym, tra ta feme oc er cooney er lheh ny tra t'ad jannoo ymmyd jeh lioaryn ayns çhengey joarree. Ny yei shen, as mish er vaagail, cha nee y ben-chione cur stiagh "ablid çhengey" er y rolley tra t'ee shirrey peiagh ynnydagh dou. She leagh neuloaghtagh t'ayn mannagh vel yn ablid shen oc; cha nod oo cur feeu er. Er lhiam, ta caa share daue cur "ablid co-earrooder" er y rolley, son ga nagh row shen femoil da'n staartey hooar mee, ta mee er ngoaill orrym pene shaleeyn co-earrooder rish ny bleeantyn. Gyn yn ablid shen, bee eh orroo scuirr shaleeyn, ny surranse gyn oltscarrey fysseree b'oallagh dou jannoo eh. Shen coayl fondagh as discreadjagh.

Ta cooishyn elley ayn, gyn ourys. S'cooin lhiam dy mie tra hoilshee jantys faillee 'sy valley son screeudeyr: begin da Spaanish as Frangish flaaoil ve echey, chammah's y Vaarle, as cre'n faill hebb ad? Y faill cheddin as y fogrey rish son screeudeyr as Baarle ynrican echey! Cha nel mee shirrey lheid ny focklyn, as cha dod mee feddyn fysseree mie dy tappee, agh er lhiam son y chooid smoo nagh vel ad garral faill share tra t'ad shirrey ablid çhengey ayns staartaghyn cadjin. Vel ad credjal, foddee, dy vel çhengey 'laaoil ny tro neuchramp, ga dy vel ad cur leagh er keim ollooscoillagh ny teisht çhaghnoaylleeagh? Agh er lhiam dy nee colughtyn beggey t'ayn, as ta toiggalys share ec colughtyn yl-heeragh.

Loayrt gyn jannoo

'Syn aght cheddin, ta politickeyryn as failleyrderyn loayrt dy mennick er dolley ablid çhengey ayns ny h-Inshyn Goaldagh. T'ad gra dy vel y dolley shen lhiettal farrys Goaldagh, lhiettal studeyryn Goaldagh veih jannoo studeyrys ass ny çheeraghyn shoh, lhiettal obbree Ghoaldagh veih obbraghey har mooir, lhiettal mestey sheshoil Juanyn Haink Noal, jannoo lhiettrimys er shirveishyn oikoil da Juanyn as çhengaghyn mayrey elley oc, as myr shen magh.

Er y laue elley, c'red t'ad jannoo? Wahll, t'ad giarrey rheynn çhengaghyn 'sy churriglym ashoonagh; t'ad follaghey (ny jannoo sloo jeh) nyn ablid çhengey hene, mannagh nee Ladjyn t'ayn, son ta eie quaagh ayn nagh nee red Goaldagh eh çhengaghyn elley y ve ayd; t'ad craidey mish politickeyryn elley as çhengaghyn joarree oc, myr dy nee cowrey raaue t'ayn dy vel ad cur co-chialg ennagh er bun marish çheer elley; as cha nel ad cur argid da ynsaghey çhengaghyn.

My ta çhengaghyn wheesh scanshoil as shen, c'raad ta'n argid? C'raad ta'n eeckys-listal son faillee yl-hengagh? C'raad ta'n scoillaraght dys cooney lesh obbree hene-haraghey liorish ynsaghey çhengey noa ('sy çheer dooghyssagh, jeh yoin)? C'raad ta shaleeyn dy chur obbree as studeyryn dys çheeraghyn elley son dy foyraghey ablid çhengey - ny eer skeym-coonee dauesyn ta jannoo eh er nyn son hene? C'raad ta ny coryssyn-ynsee sthie ayns colughtyn, ny traenal kied-laa, do nod obbree sharaghey ny h-aghtyn femoil shoh? Cre'n fa nagh vel scoillyn jannoo ymmyd jeh saaseyn ynsaghey thummee dys ynsaghey kemmig 'sy Rooshish? Cre'n fa nagh vel politickeyryn taishbyney yn ablid çhengey ocsyn tra t'ad loayrt rish fir-oik joarree, ny goll er turrys-ronsee - nagh lhisagh ad jannoo mooar jeh'n chaa dy chur magh feeshag voggyssagh? Cre'n fa ta eabyn dy chummal seose çhengaghyn elley ny h-Inshyn Goaldagh hene goll er flout dy mennick? Dy ghra myr shen: cre'n fa nagh vel ny cummaghtee shoh jannoo red erbee dy hickyraghey ny t'ad gra er scansh çhengaghyn joarree?

Leagh as costys ynsee

Ta feanish kionnit aym nagh vel ynsaghey çhengaghyn nastee, mannagh vel oo çheet er kynneeyn daa-hengagh as y lheid. Ta kuse dy 'leih ceau £9th+ er keim; t'ad geddyn vondeish cadjin keim, dy jarroo. Agh cur sooill lhome-ymmydoil er y chooish, she reih moal t'ayn cosoylit rish y leigh, tarmeynys, dellal, maddaght, as ymmodee keimyn elley ta bentyn dy jeeragh rish staartaghyn cadjin sleih as keim hengey yoarree oc. Ta scoill oie deyr dy liooar; ta'n skedjal as ynnyd neuchooie dy cadjin; cha nel brastyllyn mennick dy liooar dy heet my laue dy tappee; as son y chooid smoo, t'ad skellal roish er y cheim veanagh son nagh vel ynseydee dy liooar dy yannoo brastyl ard-choorse.

Ta brastyllyn preevaadjagh beggan gaueagh. She yn aght as smoo bree ynsee echey son y chooid smoo, agh ta'n leagh ard cumrail oo mannagh vel oo lane soit er ynsee. Cha nel reilley quallid erbee er ynseyderyn. She saase ard-vroo t'ayn, gyn vondeish sheshoil lane vrastyl, as myr shen cha nel eh cooie da cagh. Ta persoonid ynseydagh as ynseyder lane scanshoil, as er lhiam dy nee cooish ghoccaragh t'ayn shirrey ynseyder ynnydagh, reaghey brastyl as çheet ny whaiyl. Ta aigh vie aym, as hooar mee ynseyderyn yindyssagh, agh ta caaghyn elley ayn.

Ta reih elley ayn, as shen ny ren mish fy-yerrey: faagail yn staartey aym, as goll harrish y cheayn son studeyryn lane-emshiragh 'sy çheer dooghysagh eck, myr ynsaghey thunnee. Shoh y saase s'troshey, er lhiam, agh shimmey neuvondeish t'ayn. Ta currymyn scanshoil obbree ny persoonagh ec sleih son y chooid smoo, do nagh dod ad faagail. Ta arraghey dys çheer elley cur ram boirey ort, as ta feme er daanys, surranse foddey as schlei reaghee dy yannoo eh. Mannagh nee oo eab mooar dy vestey stiagh 'sy chultoor as y boayl, cha vow oo monney vondeish: t'eh aashagh dy liooar dy gholl lesh y stroo eddrym, as feddyn myn-chultoor eebyrtagh dy vee kionnit stiagh, meanyn ass dty heer hene, as caarjyn ass y çheer cheddin.

As ny bee ourys ort, t'eh deyr agglagh. Ta mee cummal ayns shoh rish shey meeghyn. Goaill stiagh taillaghyn-ynsee, y turrys noon as noal, as yn argid nagh vel mee cosney eh nish (as co-earrooaghey argid beaghee) ta mee ceau mysh £10,000 er yn eie shoh. Dy firrinagh, cha cosoylagh eh dy nee'm cosney £10,000 'sy traa ry-heet nagh jinnin er ny chosney gyn çheet gys yn Çhapaan. Cre mysh feddyn staartey liorish ny ta mee dy ynsaghey? Wahll, foddym feddyn staartey myr Baarleyr as beggan Shapaanish aym, agh cha dod mee cosney staartey çhyndaaee ny staartey da fer as Shapaanish echey. Cha nel mee goaill arrys edyr, agh shegin dou gra nagh vel monney niart ec yn argid-baiht shoh son feddyn staartey erbee, gyn çheet er staartey as argid mie echey. Son caa share, veagh eh orrym shirrey staartey imlee 'syn Çhapaan as ynsaghey rish blein ny ghaa elley, ny ceau ny smoo argid foast er son ny smoo studeyrys lane emshiragh.

Ta lhimmey ayn: oddin feddyn staartey fer-ynsee 'syn Çhapaan. Shen keird ghoaiagh dy liooar, agh cur geill da: cha nee ablid Shapaanish y red scanshoil t'ayn, agh ablid Baarle. Ta Shapaanish ymmydoil, gyn ourys, agh shimmey peiagh ta jannoo lheid yn obbyr gyn Shapaanish erbee, hoshiaght.

Ta'n chooid smoo jeh ny Goaldee scuirr jeh studeyrys er çhengaghyn cho leah's nagh vel eh anneydagh, as shegin dou gra dy vel y feanish maroo. S'cosoylagh nagh beagh vondeish feamagh erbee ry-gheddyn oc. Cha nel mooarane dy staartaghyn follym fieau dy surransagh derrey jig sleih as Germaanish, Mandarinish, Arabish, Choctawish, Inuktitutish, ny reih çhengey elley y laa oc. Dy jarroo, cha nel nommey caa ayn eer dy yannoo ymmyd jeu 'syn obbyr. Ga dy vel vondeishyn ry-gheddyn liorish ynsaghey çhengaghyn, she vondeishyn neuloaghtagh ny preevaadjagh t'ayn: mooadaghey yn sheiltynys ayd, toiggal meanyn ass cultooryn elley, lheie lhiettrimyssyn cultooragh ny feddyn caarjyn noa. S'doillee leagh y chur er lheid ny reddyn, as ta feme er hene-ghreesaghey dy yannoo studeyrys er nyn son. Er y laue elley, ta leagh baghtal er Teisht Maddaght: ta failleyderyn shirrey er dy cadjin, as ta feanish ayn dy vel faill meanagh smoo ocsyn as y teisht oc.

Coayl bree

Ta'n skeeal shoh jus çheet gys jerrey gyn feaysley. Er lhiam nagh vel feaysley ry-yannoo, foddee, as nagh dod shin agh loayrt er y chooish. Dy row eh ort cur faill smoo da sleih as çhengaghyn elley oc, s'cosoylagh nagh dod sleih yl-hengaghyn feddyn staartey erbee! As cha dod oo gra dy beagh shen ynrick, gyn jannoo y red cheddin son dagh ooilley ablid, my ta feme er 'sy staartey ny dyn. As ga dy vel ad loayrt, cha nee y lught-reill cur argid son ynsaghey çhengaghyn tra nagh vel feme fondagh ry-akin, dy ghra myr shen, staartaghyn hene gyn sleih dy jannoo oc, ny dellal nagh vel shin cooilleeney eh. Cha lhisagh ad noadyr. Bare lhiam lught-reill ta cur argid raad t'eh ry-laccal.

S'cosoylagh dy vel ny çheeraghyn Goaldagh coayl caaghyn kyndagh rish laccal çhengaghyn, agh er lhiam dy nee "laccal bog" t'ayn. Er lhiam dy vel yn art Economist shoh coardail rhym. Oddagh shin cur shirveish share da custymeyryn; oddagh cochianglaghyn dellal eddyr-heeragh ve ny sassey as yinnagh ad ny smoo dellal 'sy çheer ain; oddagh Goaldee arraghey har mooir ny sassey as feddyn obbyr; veagh bea ny sassey da arragheryn sthie. She arraghyssyn beggey t'ayn, as cha jinnagh ad croo staartey erbee yiarragh oo "ta feme er ablid çhengey son y staartey shoh" myechione. Gyn ourys, veagh tarmaynys share ain dy row ablid çhengaghyn ec cagh. Agh gollrish astan 'sy doarn (myr yiarragh y Bretnagh), my t'ou jannoo eab dy chur baght er mynphoyntyn, bee ad skellal royd.


I found two articles on the Guardian recently, both about job-hunting, both of which were sort of interesting and I wanted to talk about a bit.

The first is My languages guilt: am I making the most of my degree?. I don’t have a languages degree, I just learn languages a lot, so everything below is musing and observation rather than personal experience.

Six months after graduating, I found myself working as a server in the kitchen of a country hotel. I was not even allowed to take orders from customers, such was my meagre role. The only time my language skills came in useful was when the French pastry chef berated me for getting in his way.

The recently departed education secretary, Michael Gove, underlined how important languages are. He said: "There is a slam-dunk case for extending foreign language teaching to children aged five.

But as the writer points out, a majority of language graduates won’t end up working ‘in languages’, as such. They end up in law, finance, marketing, publishing or administrative jobs. The author’s key argument is not that these are unworthy jobs for a language graduate, but that it isn’t language skills that get them the jobs – general graduatehood, some transferrable skills and (often) work experience or interning does the job.

If this is the situation, then why do so many people keep banging on about the vital importance of languages to the economy, and claiming that employers are clamouring for people with language ability? Are we looking at the wrong jobs? Or perhaps, are there loads of jobs out there for polyglots who don't have a language degree?

In fact, language graduates seem to do worse (DLHE table E) at finding jobs than many other graduates, with only history, philosophy and law further behind (lawyers will generally need further training before they can work in their field, boosting the numbers still studying a mere 6 months after graduation).

I remember that when I graduated, I was faced with a blanket of nothingness; the only options in front of me were the competitive graduate schemes (most of which required that I sit some kind of maths test which I was almost guaranteed to fail), a masters (I'd had enough of studying for the time being), target-hitting sales roles (not for a person who finds it hard to say no), or teaching. None of that appealed. I felt betrayed.

I think a lot of the problem here is something I’ve complained about to people before, which is that politicians, captains of industry and other influential figures care about language skills in much the same way they care about, say, climate change. This is to say: they feel strongly enough to regularly talk about how dreadful the situation is, emphasise how important it is that other people do their bit to change the situation, and make occasional gestures to try and impress with their dedication, but it is vanishingly rare for anyone to care strongly enough to actually take any concrete steps that would improve the situation.

A lot of this is, inevitably, money.

It’s the economy, stupid

Employers, if they think about it at all, are broadly in favour of fluently multilingual staff. It would be handy! As a general employee, it enables you to deal conveniently with clients from other countries. If you work in legal stuff, you can help form solid contracts with contractors, clients or employees from other countries. If in marketing or sales, you can push products, attract students, catch the attention of public bodies needing to put projects to tender, and so on. If in customer service, you can put customers at ease or deal with problems more readily, helping to build customer loyalty. If in research or information services, a wider range of material is open to you, both for tracking down information and keeping up with the cutting edge. If you talk to the media, you can present the organisation directly, rather than tolerating what may be dubious, mistaken or skewed translation, and avoid ambiguities or infelicities. It’s also more likely that you consume media or follow developments outside the Anglosphere in your own time, which may mean you learn information or discover opportunities that benefit the company.

Most importantly, there’s no downside! Talents like, say, having amazing self-confidence may make you a great leader, a great sales agent or fantastic at brokering deals with other companies, but it could also mean you make costly mistakes. IT skills are vital, but call for regular retraining and updating. There aren’t really any disadvantages to staff being bilingual, providing only that their English is good enough to deal with their normal work.

Employers will happily take those skills. What they don’t want is to pay for it.

My take is that language skills are mostly seen as a “soft skillset”, like many other of the skills that make people good employees. Let’s take interpersonal skills as an example. Yes, a subset of interpersonal skills are used at work for setting up rapport with customers, smoothing over problems or ensnaring clients (as well as workplace politicking and manipulating), but broad interpersonal skills are what allow workplaces to run harmoniously, thus helping with staff morale, productivity, making constructive suggestions more likely, making it easier to resolve problems, reducing work-related illness, and so on and so forth. However, in most trades you can’t measure or put a value on those skills, and so they are rarely recognised, nor recruited for, nor rewarded.

Language skills are similar. It’s really nice if your staff speak 20 different languages (and have at least one in common), but unless you are specifically a business working with international clients, foreign-language material or aimed at foreign customers, then it’s just a bonus. Possibly a profitable bonus, but a bonus nonetheless. It’s sort of like your database administrator being a qualified paramedic, or the office junior having an HGV licence: a skill you might occasionally ask them to use, but will neither put on their contract, nor regularly pay them for.

Sympathy for the devil

I’m not unsympathetic to the employers here. Unless languages are genuinely vital to a job, it makes no sense to add them to a job description. If the skill isn’t on a job description, then you aren’t obliged to use it, nor will you get paid for it. It gets hazier in practice, because there may be situations arising where you do use those skills, but perhaps it’s not actually essential. In the case of languages, and some other skills (IT or art are prime examples) people will often be delighted when a chance to use them does arise, and won’t avoid them just because they aren’t specifically being paid for it.

On the other hand, it would make no sense for my employer to pay me simply for possessing language skills that they didn’t ask for and don’t particularly need, even if I end up using them sometimes. It’s only really if a job gains a significant language-related workload that things start to get awkward. In some organisations, especially private companies where pay is often flexible (and indeed, argument-based), you can make a case to management that you are using skills not outlined in your job description and should get a pay rise. In public sector organisations with rigid pay scales and job categories, or when promotions aren’t an option, this flexibility often doesn’t exist. You can end up with the ridiculous situation that your boss should actively prevent you from using certain skills, as those are linked to a higher pay scale or even a more senior kind of role.

In practice, working in a university library, I made considerable use of even my meagre language skills. There were a considerable number of readers who speak German or Chinese, and while many of the long-term students were just as happy in English, some seemed to enjoy using their native language with me where possible. Some visiting for a short time, especially visiting academics, did not necessarily have a comfortable grasp of spoken English. Either group didn’t necessarily know all the specialist vocabulary used in libraries: in these cases my languages were a real asset, because one person (me) learning the appropriate terminology once helped out a significant number of clients, and I was able to teach them the English term for future reference. They also came in handy with foreign-language books, which we had a certain number of. Was it essential to my role? Absolutely not. Did it significantly improve the service I could provide to both our clients and my colleagues? Absolutely.

But even with me working there for six years, establishing the idea that certain language skills were available in that library for visitors or to help with work on particular materials, my boss isn't going to add those skills to the person specification for my replacement. The things that are lost by not having those skills in the team are qualitative, soft things. My IT skills are significantly more likely to get a slot on the spec, because as new technical projects turned up I absorbed them as the techiest person around, and without those skills the projects can't be maintained - shutting down a project, or not getting certain data analyses, is a much more concrete loss.

There are of course other cases. I well remember (and frequently recount) the employment agency in my village having signs up advertising for a secretary fluent in both Spanish and French, as well as English: the salary offered was pretty much identical to the adjacent sign for a secretary without those skills. Although I don't exactly go looking for such jobs, and haven't been able to immediately track down solid statistics, my sense has always been that there isn't a notable increase in salary for many jobs that demand language skills. Unlike degrees or technical certification, employers often seem to assume that fluency in languages is just another attribute. I suspect this is generally truer in small-scale businesses, and multinationals may be more enlightened.

Not walking the talk

In a similar vein, politicians and employers regularly talk about the way lack of language skills is limiting the British economy, ability of British students to study overseas, ability of British workers to move overseas, integration efforts, service to immigrants of other linguistic backgrounds, and so on. However, their actions tend to include cutting the role of languages in the curriculum; playing down any linguistic ability they have themselves; using others' linguistic ability as a weapon to imply they are somehow insufficiently British; and signally failing to provide funding for languages.

If languages are so important, where is the money? Where are the recruitment premiums for staff with more than one language? Where are the bursaries to help workers reskill by studying another language, ideally in its native setting? Where are the schemes to send workers or students abroad to hone language skills, or even simply mechanisms to help them arrange it themselves? Where are the in-house training schemes or job-release arrangements that enable employees to boost these invaluable abilities? Why are schools not using full immersion techniques to teach chemistry through the medium of Russian? Why do public figures not show off their language skills in meetings with foreign officials, or vid-ops on fact-finding tours? Why are even attempts to maintain the native languages of the British Isles routinely snubbed? In short, why does nobody do anything that might support the notion that languages are important?

The cost and value of learning

I can say from experience that for most people, outside bilingual families, learning languages is not free. Some take degrees that now cost £9k+, which does bring the benefits of a degree in general, but is pragmatically a poor tradeoff for law, economics, business, mathematics, or many other degrees that tie directly to the fields where many linguists end up working. Evening classes are expensive, often highly inconvenient in timing and location, too occasional to be of great help, and often wink out at higher levels because there aren’t enough students to make the class viable.

Private lessons are a minefield: though generally the most effective option, they are pricey enough to put off all but the most determined linguist; there’s no real quality control on teachers; not every can take the pressure of one-to-one teaching; they lack the social benefits of a classroom; the personality element becomes increasingly important; and it can be quite a stressful experience trying to find a teacher locally, negotiate arrangements and meet them for the first time. I have been immensely lucky to have some excellent private teachers, but that doesn’t mean it’s always true.

The other option is to do what I’ve done: leave a job and move abroad to study a language intensively in a native-language environment. This is probably the most effective option, but it has a lot of drawbacks. Many people simply couldn’t do it because of their commitments elsewhere. It’s very disruptive and requires a lot of nerve, patience and organisation to set up. You have to fight to get yourself integrated somewhat into local habits and society, rather than drifting into a private monoglot world of imported food, media from your own country and expat society.

And of course, it is colossally expensive. My six months here is costing me somewhere in the region of £10,000 – the cost of tuition, plus loss of earnings (adjusted for living costs). Realistically, it is unlikely that I will earn an extra £10,000 as a result of this experience. Will it get me a job? It’s possible that I could find a job as an English speaker with basic Japanese as a result, though I wouldn’t qualify for translation or as a genuine Japanese-speaking contact. I’m not saying I regret doing it, but honestly the jobworthy credentials of this investment are highly dubious. I’d have to either get a low-level job in Japan and work on my language for a few more years, or invest even more in full-time study, to have a better chance.

The exception, of course, is becoming an English teacher in Japan. A perfectly reasonable career choice, but notice that the really crucial point here is not my Japanese, but my English.

Meanwhile, the vast bulk of the British population who don’t pursue languages past the compulsory stage are largely justified in doing so, because they are unlikely to benefit in any practical way. There is no ocean of unfilled jobs just waiting for citizens with German, Mandarin, Arabic, Choctaw, Inuktitut or whatever other language is deemed essential at the moment. There is very little opportunity even to use these skills in a work context. The real benefits that most people see from language studies are fluffy, personal things like expansion of worldview, consuming media from other cultures, breaking down cultural barriers and potentially making new friends. Those are hard to quantify, and require self-motivation, whereas the value of A-level Maths is both widely promoted and can be quantified in average salary terms.

Running out of steam

I’m sort of going to peter out here, because I don’t think this is really the kind of problem that can go anywhere, only get talked about. Certainly I'm not going to offer a magic solution. Somehow enforcing higher rates of pay for language skills would, in most cases, be an expense on employers that made it harder for linguists to get jobs, while there’s no reasonable way to justify it for languages but not for other skills. Governments aren’t really likely to start funding language-learning when there doesn’t actually seem to be any concrete, solid need for it in terms of specific jobs that could be filled, or specific deals that could be done. They probably shouldn't, either; I'd prefer a government to spend money where it's actually needed.

Sadly, I’m pretty sure there are lots of missed economic opportunities because of language shortages, but I think they’re soft shortages. This Economist article seems to broadly agree. Customer experiences that could be a little better. Relationships with overseas firms that might be a little smoother, and lead to small changes in where they choose to make deals or investments. Obstructed flow of workers around the world. Lack of integration. Lots of little things that wouldn’t ever add up to any specific job that could justifiably have “needs language skills” stamped on it. Would a completely multilingual workforce lead to a better economy? Almost certainly. But like an eel in the fist (as the Welsh say), I think any time you try to grasp the specifics, they’ll slip away from you.